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Mimosa Rocks National Park

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Learn more about why this park is special

Mimosa Rocks National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

Bygone eras

Moon Bay, Mimosa Rocks National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

White settlers arrived in the Bega Valley in the 1830s, attracted by its grazing and farming potential, with Bega township being established in 1851. In its earliest years the town traders used Moon Bay as a regional port shipping Timber and sheep products from its sheltered waters. You can still see a log-slide and mooring ring from bygone days, or take a walk to 'Riverview' in the park's south-east, the remains of these historic premises have important associations with the 19th century timber and coastal shipping industries. 

  • Mimosa Rocks walking track Great for walking with children, the easy Mimosa Rocks walk takes you along a short boardwalk to a lookout. You may spot the Mimosa shipwreck on the rocks below.
  • Moon Bay A short and easy walking track descends steeply to the secluded beach at Moon Bay in Mimosa Rocks National Park. Enjoy a picnic on the sand and explore the historic heritage of the area.

Ancient connections

Mongarlowe River, Dasyurus picnic area, Monga National Park. Photo: Lucas Boyd

Mimosa Rocks National Park lies within the traditional Country of the Yuin people who have inhabited the region for thousands of years, climbing these headlands, swimming in the rivers and lakes, crossing the sand dunes and walking the beaches. The plants and animals within the park were a source of food, medicine and shelter for the Yuin people and the park's landscape is strongly connected to Dreaming stories. Be sure to take the Mimosa Rocks walk for an insight into the Aboriginal heritage within the park.

  • Mimosa Rocks walking track Great for walking with children, the easy Mimosa Rocks walk takes you along a short boardwalk to a lookout. You may spot the Mimosa shipwreck on the rocks below.

What we're doing for Aboriginal culture in this park

Wildlife haven

Middle Lagoon walking track, Mimosa Rocks National Park. Photo: John Yurasek

The park provides refuge for koalas, swamp wallabies and ringtail possums, to name a few. Of an evening at Aragunnu campground, you may not see yellow-bellied gliders flitting between trees, but you might be able to hear their distinctive cackling sound that cuts through the silence of the night. At Gillards campground you may well see a long-nosed potoroo. About the size of a rabbit, they look quite similar to a bandicoot, except that they hop in a similar way to a kangaroo. The potoroo is nocturnal, so you are most likely to see them in the evening. The park is an important stop for many migratory birds that nest along the park’s coastline. Look along the beaches and rock platforms – you may see threatened hooded plovers or pied oystercatchers. The bar-tailed godwit stops by briefly in summer during its migration from Alaska to New Zealand. It’s a well deserved stop off as the bar-tailed godwit makes the longest known non-stop flight of any bird and the longest journey without pausing to feed by any animal. Look for them around the park’s lakes and lagoons.

  • Wajurda Point lookout Wajurda Point lookout, in Mimosa Rocks National Park offers coastal and ocean views with seasonal whale watching opportunities.

What we're doing for Biodiversity in this park

Plant spectacular

Mimosa Rocks walking track, Mimosa Rocks National Park. Photo: David Finnegan

When you’re driving from the south and about to cross the Bega River, you are sure to notice the knife edge boundary of spotted gum, with an understorey of burrawang palms; characteristic vegetation of Mimosa Rocks National Park. When exploring the dunes and cliffs of the park you’ll see coastal banksia, coast wattle and drooping she-oak that can withstand winds and salty air. Check the gullies for the tubular flowers of the endangered chefs hat correa, so called because it’s a similar shape to a chef’s hat.

  • Mimosa Rocks walking track Great for walking with children, the easy Mimosa Rocks walk takes you along a short boardwalk to a lookout. You may spot the Mimosa shipwreck on the rocks below.
  • Moon Bay A short and easy walking track descends steeply to the secluded beach at Moon Bay in Mimosa Rocks National Park. Enjoy a picnic on the sand and explore the historic heritage of the area.

Plants and animals you may see

Animals

  • Sugar glider. Photo: Jeff Betteridge

    Sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps)

    The sugar glider is a tree-dwelling Australian native marsupial, found in tall eucalypt forests and woodlands along eastern NSW. The nocturnal sugar glider feeds on insects and birds, and satisfies its sweet tooth with nectar and pollens.

Plants

  • Wonga Wonga vine. Photo: Barry Collier

    Wonga wonga vine (Pandorea pandorana)

    The wonga wonga vine is a widespread vigorous climber usually found along eastern Australia. A variation of the plant occurs in the central desert, where it resembles a sprawling shrub. One of the more common Australian native plants, the wonga wonga vine produces bell-shaped white or yellow flowers in the spring, followed by a large oblong-shaped seed pod.

  •  Black sheoak. Photo: Barry Collier

    Black sheoak (Allocasuarina littoralis)

    The black sheoak is one of a number of casuarina species found across the east coast of Australia and nearby tablelands. Growing to a height of 5-15m, these hardy Australian native plants can survive in poor or sandy soils. The barrel-shaped cone of the black sheoak grows to 10-30mm long.

  • Blueberry ash. Photo: Jaime Plaza

    Blueberry ash (Elaeocarpus reticulatus)

    The blueberry ash is a rainforest shrub which produces blue olive-shaped berries and spectacular bell-shaped flowers, which often appear on the plant together. It is a tall slender shrub or small tree found in rainforest, tall eucalypt forest and coastal bushland in eastern NSW, south-east Queensland and Victoria.

  • Grey mangrove. Photo: Shane Rumming

    Grey mangrove (Avicennia marina)

    Grey mangrove is the most common and widespread mangrove found within intertidal zones across Australia, and throughout the world. Growing to a height of 3-10m, they thrive best in estuaries with a mix of fresh and salt water. They excrete excess salt through their long thick leaves, and absorb oxygen through their aerial root system.

Look out for...

Blueberry ash

Elaeocarpus reticulatus

Blueberry ash. Photo: Jaime Plaza

The blueberry ash is a rainforest shrub which produces blue olive-shaped berries and spectacular bell-shaped flowers, which often appear on the plant together. It is a tall slender shrub or small tree found in rainforest, tall eucalypt forest and coastal bushland in eastern NSW, south-east Queensland and Victoria.

Environments in this park

Education resources (1)

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Wajurda Point beach view. Photo: John Yurasek