Marramarra National Park

Overview

Marramarra National Park is a one of the Hawkesbury’s best-kept secrets. It’s great for canoeing, kayaking, swimming, cycling, camping, bushwalking, picnicking and birdwatching.

Read more about Marramarra National Park

Marramarra National Park is one of the Hawkesbury’s best-kept secrets and has to be among the most exciting national parks in the country. Hidden away in the northern outskirts of Sydney at the junction of Hawkesbury River and Berowra Creek, it’s a peaceful pocket of Aussie bush on Sydney’s doorstep, just waiting to be explored.

It’s so close to the city, but you’ll barely see another soul. Go boating, kayaking and canoeing on the beautiful waters of Hawkesbury River and Marramarra Creek. Enjoy bushwalking on the many walking tracks and go cycling on your mountain bike along Canoelands Ridge management trail. Take in spectacular views while discovering more about the area’s Aboriginal heritage, and see historic heritage sites from early European settlement.

From all this exploring, you’ll probably be looking for somewhere to take a break. Get back to basics and spend a night camping at Gentlemans Halt or Marramarra Creek campgrounds on the shores of Hawkesbury River. Or simply drop in for the day and enjoy this beautiful place to picnic, not far from Hornsby.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/marramarra-national-park/local-alerts

Contact

See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Marramarra National Park.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    From Hornsby:

    • Follow Galston Road through Galston Gorge
    • To access the southern precinct, turn right into Arcadia Road, then after approximately 4km, turn left into Cobah Road and continue along Bloodwood Road to the park.
    • To access the northern precinct, continue through Galston and turn right onto Old Northern Road, then after approximately 18km, turn right into Canoelands Road.

    From Wisemans Ferry:

    • Drive south on Old Northern Road towards Dural
    • To access the northern precinct, turn left into Canoelands Road after approximately 18km.
    • To access the southern precinct, after approximately 34km, turn left into Wylds Road, continue, then turn left into Arcadia Road. After approximately 4km, turn left into Cobah Road and continue along Bloodwood Road to the park.

    Park entry points

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW website for more information.

    By public transport

    For information about public transport options, visit the NSW transport info website

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Marramarra National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Autumn

    Unwind and take in the serenity of camping at Gentlemans Halt or Marramarra Creek campgrounds.

    Spring

    Wander through the bush and enjoy the colourful display of wildflowers.

    Summer

    Paddle the waterways by kayak or canoe and have a swim in the rivers.

    Winter

    Enjoy longer hikes and day walks such as Canoelands Ridge walking track or Marramarra Ridge to Smugglers Ridge walking track.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    19°C and 28°C

    Highest recorded

    44.8°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    6°C and 16°C

    Facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit, it helps emergency services locate you using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park and you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the OEH pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Hornsby (24 km)

    A suburb in Sydney's upper north shore, Hornsby is conveniently located for easy access to Lane Cove National Park, Berowra Valley Regional Park, and the heritage-listed Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park - Australia's second-oldest national park. Explore walking and cycling tracks and Aboriginal sites, as well as marinas, cafes and picnic areas.

    www.hornsby.nsw.gov.au

    Sydney City Centre (51 km)

    No trip to Sydney is complete without spending some time in the city’s beautiful parks. Whether it’s in central areas like Hyde Park or the Royal Botanic Gardens or further out in Centennial Parklands, there’s plenty of green space to go out and enjoy.

    www.sydney.com

    Hawkesbury area

    Explore the beautiful Hawkesbury River with Australia's Last River Boat Postman, or sample fresh oysters at a casual riverside cafe. Start your Hawkesbury adventure with a seaplane flight from Sydney to a local restaurant by the river.

    www.sydney.com

    Learn more

    Marramarra National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Is it a bird?

    Flannel flowers (Actinotus helianthi), Marramarra National Park. Photo: Michael Jarman

    Marramarra is home to a great diversity of animals and birds, making it a great place for wildlife spotting and bird watching. You're likely to spot a white-breasted sea eagle, swamp wallaby, possum or kingfisher in your travels. If you're lucky, you might come across some of the more uncommon animals found here such as rails, gang-gang and glossy black cockatoos, and red-crowned toadlets.

    Plentiful lands

    View of the Hawkesbury River, Marramarra National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    The sandstone ridges and deep gullies of Marramarra support a wide range of environments. Experience salt marsh and mangrove forests on the shores of Hawkesbury River, to tall open forest and ridge-top woodlands. In spring, the bush turns into a brilliant display of colour as the wildflowers burst in action. Discover the unique plant life and help preserve it – why not participate in the bush regeneration volunteer programs in the park?

    Exploring the land

    View of the Hawkesbury River, Marramarra National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    In the early days of the new colony, Hawkesbury River was a major communication route and supported an active river-based community. European exploration began as early as 1789 when Governor Arthur Phillip took his second trip up Hawkesbury River and camped at Gentlemans Halt. By 1884, there was a small community at Gentlemans Halt and a provisional school had been established; you can still see the foundations of a road and a wharf from this era. Other reminders of European historic heritage include remains of orange orchards along Marramarra Creek and the foundations of a hut, stone walls and a well at Big Bay.

    Darug country

    Sandstone cave, Marramarra National Park. Photo: John Spencer

    Marramarra is part of the traditional lands of the Darug Aboriginal people. Their use and respect of the land can be found in isolated corners of the park. The surviving Aboriginal sites, which provide the only indications of traditional life in the area, are of special importance to local Aboriginal communities. Cave art, rock engravings, grinding grooves, middens, scarred trees, and other occupational deposits and stone arrangements are all part of Marramarra. 

    Education resources (1)

    What we're doing

    Marramarra National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents.

    Marramarra National Park. Photo: John Spencer/NSW Government