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Crowdy Bay National Park

What we're doing

Park management activities

Crowdy Bay National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

Preserving biodiversity

Endangered habitats are found in Crowdy Bay National Park. NPWS is committed to the survival of endangered species and the ecosystems on which they depend, and works to educate the public on sustainable national park visitation wherever possible. Interpretive information on the topic is regularly maintained within this park. Programs to rehabilitate damaged parkland is also ongoing.

Conservation program

BioNet

Uniting technology with the vast collection of information on biodiversity in NSW, BioNet is a valuable database open to any user. From individual plant sightings to detailed scientific surveys, it offers a wealth of knowledge about ecology and threatened species in NSW. 

Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

Pests and weeds have a significant impact to the ecosystems within Crowdy Bay National Park. Risk assessments for new and emerging weeds are carried out as an ongoing initiative within the park. Pest management of weeds such as bitou bush and lantana, and vertebrate pests like foxes is a priority and an important part of the work NPWS does to protect the integrity of biodiversity which exists within Crowdy Bay National Park.

Conservation program

Bitou bush threat abatement plan

Bitou bush poses a serious and widespread threat to threatened species populations and ecological communities on the NSW coast. The NPWS bitou bush threat abatement plan helps to reduce the impact of weeds at priority sites using control measures such as ground spraying, aerial spraying, biological control and physical removal.

Developing visitor facilities and experiences

Crowdy Bay National Park is committed to keeping its visitors safe and informed, and this extends to issues of park access. Maintenance of national park infrastructure, including roads and access systems, is ongoing in this park, with relevant upgrades designed to further protect beaches and other natural assets.

Conserving our Aboriginal culture

Aboriginal culture is of great value to NPWS and the wider community, and the conditions of Crowdy Bay National Park’s significant Aboriginal sites and assets are monitored and conserved. In doing this, NPWS liaises with local Aboriginal communities wherever possible, and NPWS consideration of new interpretation projects is ongoing.

Managing fire

NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

Conservation program

Hazard reduction program

Managing fire-prone NSW national parks requires a three-pronged approach, including fire planning, community education, and fuel management. When it comes to fuel like dead wood, NPWS conducts planned hazard reduction activities like mowing and controlled burning to assist in the protection of life, property and community.

Contact

  • in the North Coast region
  • Crowdy Bay National Park is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

  • Park entry fees:

    $8 per vehicle per day. Pay park entry fees at the Diamond Head campground onsite office.

    Buy an annual pass.
    • Port Macquarie
      (02) 6588 5555
      Contact hours: 9am-4.30pm Monday to Friday
    • 22 Blackbutt Road, Port Macquarie NSW
    • Fax: (02) 6588 5500
    More
See more visitor info
View the natural arch on the Diamond Head Loop walk. Quick access is via the track head at Indian Head campground. Photo: Debby McGerty