Bongil Bongil National Park

Overview

Bongil Bongil National Park, near Coffs Harbour on the NSW north coast is a great spot for fishing and barbecues, great for a day trip or school excursions. It is also home to a large population of koalas.

Read more about Bongil Bongil National Park

Bongil Bongil National Park, south of Coffs Harbour, has plenty to offer, including wild beaches, sweeping coastal views and peaceful streams.

The park is popular with locals for a spot of fishing, either on the pontoon by Bonville creek or on the beach around Bundagen Head. Picnic and barbecue facilities are available nearby and there are opportunities for both beach and rainforest walking. The park is also a regional favourite for mountain bike adventures.

The rainforest of Bongil Bongil National Park provides habitat for migrating birds and animals, and surrounding eucalypt forests are home to one of NSW’s largest koala populations. You might see them sleeping in the treetops or munching on leaves.

With so much to offer visitors, it’s no wonder Bongil Bongil is a popular beach holiday destination. Guided tours are available during school holidays and holiday accommodation is available at Bundagen Cottage at Tuckers Rocks.

Current alerts in this area

There are no current alerts in this area.

Local alerts

For the latest updates on fires, closures and other alerts in this area, see http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/visit-a-park/parks/bongil-bongil-national-park/local-alerts

Contact

  • in the North Coast region
  • Bongil Bongil National Park is open sunrise to sunset but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

    • Coffs Harbour
      (02) 6652 0900
      Contact hours: 8.30am-4.30pm Monday to Friday
    • 32 Marina Drive, Coffs Harbour NSW
    • Fax: (02) 6651 9525
    More
See more visitor info

Visitor info

All the practical information you need to know about Bongil Bongil National Park.

Getting there and parking

Get driving directions

Get directions

    From Coffs Harbour and Urunga:

    • Take the Reptom / Mylestom exit from the new Pacific Highway
    • Take Perry's Hill Road from the old Pacific Highway
    • Perry's Hill Road becomes Tuckers Road

    From Sawtell:

    • Take Boronia Street to access Sawtell headland
    • Take Lyons Road for Bonville Estuary and Bongil picnic area

    Park entry points

    Parking

    By bike

    Check out the Bicycle information for NSW website for more information.

    Best times to visit

    There are lots of great things waiting for you in Bongil Bongil National Park. Here are some of the highlights.

    Autumn

    With cooler weather, it's a great time to explore the mountain bike tracks in the park.

    Summer

    A great time to explore Bonville Creek by canoe, kayak or stand-up paddle board.

    Winter

    Look for birds feeding on fruit-bearing trees in the rainforest.

    Weather, temperature and rainfall

    Summer temperature

    Average

    20°C and 27°C

    Highest recorded

    43.3°C

    Winter temperature

    Average

    9°C and 21°C

    Lowest recorded

    -3.2°C

    Rainfall

    Wettest month

    March

    Driest month

    September

    The area’s highest recorded rainfall in one day

    404.6mm

    Facilities

    Maps and downloads

    Safety messages

    However you discover NSW national parks and reserves, we want you to have a safe and enjoyable experience. Our park and reserve systems contrast greatly so you need to be aware of the risks and take responsibility for your own safety and the safety of those in your care.

    Mobile safety

    Dial Triple Zero (000) in an emergency. Download the Emergency + app before you visit; it helps emergency services locate you, using your smartphone's GPS. Please note there is limited mobile phone reception in this park, you’ll need mobile reception to call Triple Zero (000).

    Prohibited

    Pets

    Pets and domestic animals (other than certified assistance animals) are not permitted. Find out which regional parks allow dog walking and see the OEH pets in parks policy for more information.

    Smoking

    NSW national parks are no smoking areas.

    Nearby towns

    Sawtell (1 km)

    Sawtell is a beautiful town framed by beaches and a national park.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Coffs Harbour (10 km)

    Coffs Harbour is a coastal city on the North Coast, packed with things to do. It's surrounded by lush forests and national parks.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Urunga (16 km)

    Urunga is a tranquil holiday resort and one of the State's secret treasures. The town is set on a coastal location at the mouth of the Bellinger and Kalang rivers.

    www.visitnsw.com

    Learn more

    Bongil Bongil National Park is a special place. Here are just some of the reasons why:

    Birdwatcher's haven

    Bundagaree Rainforest walk, Bongil Bongil National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

    In addition to being home to one of NSW's largest koala populations, Bongil Bongil National Park also boasts more than 165 species of birds. The park provides breeding, roosting and feeding habitats for a number of migratory birds like the little tern and the pied oystercatcher. The Bundagaree Rainforest walk is the best place to see the birds of the rainforest, like the dramatically beautiful wompoo fruit dove and the colourful rose-crowned fruit dove that makes a loud and explosive "hookco" sound.

    • Bongil Beach Bongil Beach, in Bongil Bongil National Park near Coffs Harbour, is a remote beach ideal for walking and fishing offering scenic coastal views and birdwatching.
    • Bundagaree Rainforest walk Bundagaree Rainforest walk is near Tuckers Rocks in Bongil Bongil National Park on the NSW north coast. This easy walk takes in rainforest and beach.

    Beaches and waterways

    Bonville Beach, Bongil Bongil National Parks. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

    The waterways within Bongil Bongil National Park carry water across the coastal plains from the steep foothills to the west, providing a home for many types of birds, animals and reptiles. For visitors, the waterways and beaches in Bongil Bongil National Park offer a range of water activities, including excellent fishing and kayaking. Try your luck on the Bonville river for flathead and whiting.

    A place where one stays a long time

    Bundagaree Rainforest walk, Bongil Bongil National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

    Bongil Bongil National Park is the traditional land of the Gumbaynggir people, whose ancestral lands extend from Grafton in the north to the Nambucca river in the south, and from the coast west to the headwaters of the Nymboida river. The park provided abundant seafood and bushtucker, and was a site for gatherings and sacred ceremonies.

    • Bush tucker Bush tucker is a school excursion in Bongil Bongil National Park for Stage 5 (Years 9-10) students focusing on geography as a KLA. Join our Aboriginal Discovery rangers for an easy stroll along the forested banks of Bonville Creek to investigate the rich diversity of plants and animals in the park.
    • Bush Tucker Bush tucker is a Stage 3 (Years 5-6) school excursion in Bongil Bongil National Park which focuses on HSIE. Join our Aboriginal Discovery rangers for an easy walk along the forested banks of Bonville Creek, to investigate the rich diversity of plants and animals in this park.
    • Bush Tucker Bush tucker is a Stage 4 (Years 7-8) school excursion to Bongil Bongil National Park, which focuses on geography as a KLA. Join our Aboriginal Discovery rangers for an easy stroll along the forested banks of Bonville Creek, to investigate the rich diversity of plants and animals in the park.
    • Bush Tucker Bush tucker in Bongil Bongil National Park is a school excursion for Stage 2 (Years 3-4) students with a focus on HSIE. Join our Aboriginal Discovery rangers for an easy stroll along the forested banks of Bonville Creek, to investigate the rich diversity of plants and animals in the park.

    Plants and animals you may see

    Animals

    • Koala. Photo: Lucy Morrell

      Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

      One of the most renowned Australian animals, the tree-dwelling marsupial koala can be found in gum tree forests and woodlands across eastern NSW, Victoria and Queensland, as well as in isolated regions in South Australia. With a vice-like grip, this perhaps most iconic but endangered Australian animal lives in tall eucalypts within a home range of several hectares.

    • Grey headed flying fox. Photo: David McKellar

      Grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus)

      The grey-headed flying fox is one of several threatened Australian animals and the largest Australian native bat, with a wingspan that extends up to 1m. Known to inhabit woodlands, rainforests and urban regions, these fascinating nocturnal mammals congregate in large roost sites along the east coast of NSW.

    •  Lace monitor. Photo: Lucas Boyd

      Lace monitor (Varanus varius)

      One of Australia’s largest lizards, the carnivorous tree-dwelling lace monitor, or tree goanna, can grow to 2m in length and is found in forests and coastal tablelands across eastern Australia. These Australian animals are typically dark blue in colour with whitish spots or blotches.

    Plants

    • Grey mangrove. Photo: Shane Rumming

      Grey mangrove (Avicennia marina)

      Grey mangrove is the most common and widespread mangrove found within intertidal zones across Australia, and throughout the world. Growing to a height of 3-10m, they thrive best in estuaries with a mix of fresh and salt water. They excrete excess salt through their long thick leaves, and absorb oxygen through their aerial root system.

    • Blueberry ash. Photo: Jaime Plaza

      Blueberry ash (Elaeocarpus reticulatus)

      The blueberry ash is a rainforest shrub which produces blue olive-shaped berries and spectacular bell-shaped flowers, which often appear on the plant together. It is a tall slender shrub or small tree found in rainforest, tall eucalypt forest and coastal bushland in eastern NSW, south-east Queensland and Victoria.

    Environments in this park

    Education resources (1)

    School excursions (4)

    What we're doing

    Bongil Bongil National Park has management strategies in place to protect and conserve the values of this park. Visit the OEH website for detailed park and fire management documents. Here is just some of the work we’re doing to conserve these values:

    Preserving biodiversity

    Bongil Bongil National Park embraces programs dedicated to preserving vulnerable, threatened and endangered species, and involves the community in efforts to maintain its biodiversity. Volunteer programs take place in this park and include surveying vulnerable species, such as koalas. Efforts to minimise threats to such plant, animal and bird species are ongoing.

    Conservation program

    BioNet

    Uniting technology with the vast collection of information on biodiversity in NSW, BioNet is a valuable database open to any user. From individual plant sightings to detailed scientific surveys, it offers a wealth of knowledge about ecology and threatened species in NSW. 

    Managing weeds, pest animals and other threats

    Pests and weeds have a significant impact on the ecosystems within Bongil Bongil National Park. Pest reduction of foxes is an important part of the work NPWS does to protect the integrity of biodiversity within the park. Risk assessments for new and emerging weeds are carried out as an ongoing initiative in the area.

    Conservation program

    Wild dog control program

    Wild dogs can have significant impacts on other animals and are regarded as pests. Our wild dog control program operates in many NSW national parks and reserves. When carrying out such pest control, we aim to minimise the wild dogs’ effects on livestock and wildlife, while still maintaining dingo conservation in key areas.

    Developing visitor facilities and experiences

    NPWS is dedicated to providing outstanding facilities and experiences for visitors to all NSW national parks. Amenities in Bongil Bongil National Park, including tourist accommodation, receive ongoing management and maintenance.

    Managing fire

    NSW is one of the most bushfire prone areas in the world as a result of our climate, weather systems, vegetation and the rugged terrain. NPWS is committed to maintaining natural and cultural heritage values and minimising the likelihood and impact of bushfires via a strategic program of fire research, fire planning, hazard reduction, highly trained rapid response firefighting crews and community alerts.

    Conservation program

    Hazard reduction program

    Managing fire-prone NSW national parks requires a three-pronged approach, including fire planning, community education, and fuel management. When it comes to fuel like dead wood, NPWS conducts planned hazard reduction activities like mowing and controlled burning to assist in the protection of life, property and community.

    4WD vehicle on the beach, Bongil Bongil National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary