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Tyagarah Nature Reserve


Tyagarah Nature Reserve protects 7km of coastline where you can swim, fish, birdwatch, eat at the picnic area, or sunbathe au natural at the nudist beach area.

Read more about Tyagarah Nature Reserve

Tyagarah Nature Reserve protects a lovely strip of coastline, which runs for 7km between Byron Bay and Brunswick Heads. The coastal heath provides a gorgeous backdrop to the reserve’s unspoilt beach.

Catch a few waves, stroll by the water, build sandcastles with the kids or throw your line into the water for a spot of fishing – all within easy reach of Byron Bay township, yet peacefully away from the crowds.

In spring, eager whale-watchers gather on the beach, hoping to catch sight of the humpback whale mums and their new calves passing by on their way home from the Great Barrier Reef to Antarctica.

There are bushwalking tracks behind the dunes that self-reliant bushwalkers will enjoy exploring. Or, you can just kick back and relax in the picnic area.

The beach adjacent to the reserve, south of the picnic area at the end of Grays Lane, has been designated a ‘clothes optional beach’ (nudist beach) by Byron Shire Council.

Highlights in this park

  • Tyagarah Nature Reserve picnic area, Tyagarah Nature Reserve. Photo: David Young

    Tyagarah Nature Reserve picnic area

    Relax at this lovely picnic area next to Tyagarah Nature Reserve. Wander the nearby bush tracks, or head to the beach for swimming, sunbathing or fish...


Get Wild About Whales in Byron And Tweed

NSW national parks around Byron Bay have the best vantage points to see whales during their annual migration, which takes place from June to November. Plan your next coastal adventure on the Wild About Whales website.

Cosy Corner, Cape Byron State Conservation Area. Photo: John Spencer/OEH

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken


See more visitor info
Tyagarag Nature Reserve. Photo: David Young