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Weeping Rock walking track

New England National Park

Overview

A short walk along Weeping Rock walking track in New England National Park will take you to a basalt cliff with natural springs above and covered in moss and ferns.

Where
New England National Park
Distance
2km return
Time suggested
30min - 1hr
Grade
Grade 3
Price
Free
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
  • The weather in the area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you’re well-prepared for your visit.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to bird watch

Snaking through Gondwana rainforest and past Antarctic beeches, Weeping Rock walking track takes you directly to the much-admired basalt cliff face. With natural springs directly above it, Weeping Rock has become a lush, moss-covered environment constantly dripping water.

During winter, this spectacular rock face is covered in a sheet of ice and individual rivulets of water are transformed into icicles. When it’s not quite so cold, listen for the long, creaking growls of the rare sphagnum frog that lives in cracks in the rock face or burrows into the moss.

It’s only a 950m walk to Weeping Rock and back with pockets of both steep and uneven ground. Kids in particular love this walk – caves, fascinating trees, rocks to scramble over and water make it the perfect combination for a fun day out.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Google Trekker, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

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Park info

See more visitor info
Weeping Rock walking track, New England National Park. Photo: N Fenton