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Tea Tree Falls walking track

New England National Park

Overview

Roam through eucalypt forest and beneath hanging moss on Tea Tree Falls walking track, linking Thungutti campground and Toms Cabin in New England National Park.

Where
New England National Park
Distance
4km return
Time suggested
1hr 15min - 1hr 45min
Grade
Grade 3
Price
Free
Please note
  • The weather in the area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you’re well-prepared for your visit.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to go bird watching

It’s easy to imagine you’ve wandered into a prehistoric forest on Tea Tree Falls walking track. Brown barrel eucalypts tower above you, while honeyeaters call from the understorey of banksia and tea tree.

Approaching Toms Cabin, you walk through a patch of Antarctic beech with hanging moss dripping from its branches. Here, near the headwaters of Styx River, the damp conditions prove excellent territory for other types of moss, including tall moss, which grows to 25cm, and sphagnum moss.

Tea Tree Falls walking track is one of the easiest tracks in this part of New England National Park, and is suitable for all walkers. It links Thungutti campground and Toms Cabin. For those who want to do a longer hike, it also joins Lyrebird walk and Eagles Nest walking track.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Google Trekker, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Conservation program:

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Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

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Park info

See more visitor info
Tea Tree Falls walking track, New England National Park. Photo: H Clark