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Lyrebird Link track

Dorrigo National Park

Overview

Lyrebird link is an easy walking track in Dorrigo National Park near Coffs Harbour. It is a great spot for birdwatching and there are picnic and barbecue areas nearby.

Where
Dorrigo National Park
Distance
0.8km return
Time suggested
30min - 1hr
Grade
Grade 2
Price
Free
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
What to
bring
Drinking water
Please note

  • Bring a Dorrigo National Park map with you when you walk
  • The rainforest temperature can be cooler, so it's a good idea to bring a jacket

This easy, short walk from the Dorrigo Rainforest Centre is a great place to start your exploration of the World Heritage listed rainforests of Dorrigo National Park. The gently sloping walkway takes you into the world of Gondwana.

The lush rainforest contains giant stinging trees, birds nest ferns and lawyer cane palms that use their tiny hooks to climb high into the rainforest canopy in search of sunlight. There are information panels along the way to help you find out more about the rainforest plants and animals.

To increase your chances of seeing a rose-crowned fruit dove or a brightly coloured king parrot extend your walk along the Wonga walk and be sure to walk quietly and look closely.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Promotional:

NPWS self-guided tours app

'Rainforest birds revealed' is an easy stroll that takes you from Dorrigo Rainforest Centre into the heart of the rainforest to places where different birds like to hang out. Download the app and discover the lovable personalities and quirky habits of wildlife along the way.

Bird in the trees in Dorrigo National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary/Seen Australia

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Park info

See more visitor info
Rainforest setting. Photo:Rob Cleary