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Border loop walk

Border Ranges National Park

Overview

Walk the short and easy Border loop walk through World Heritage-listed rainforest. Enjoy spectacular views from the lookout and finish with a picnic at the end.

Where
Border Ranges National Park
Accessibility
Easy
Distance
1.5km loop
Time suggested
15 - 45min
Grade
Grade 2
Price
Free
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
What to
bring
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • You’ll find picnic and barbecue facilities at Border loop lookout where the walk commences
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to birdwatch

Take a break from touring the Tweed Range scenic drive and stop in at Border loop.

The circuit track leaves from Border loop lookout and picnic area, taking you on a short walk through a canopy of World Heritage-listed rainforest. This forest supports a population of koalas, so make sure you look high into the canopy for a glimpse of an Australian icon. If you’re interested in finding out more about the ancient rainforest plants, be sure to check out the track-side signs as you walk.

When you come to the end of the track, spend some time taking in views of Gradys Creek valley and the historic Border loop railway line that tunnels through the McPherson range from Border loop lookout. It’s a great place for a barbecue or picnic lunch.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Park info

See more visitor info
Looking along the Border Loop track. Photo:John Spencer