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Moon Bay

Mimosa Rocks National Park

Overview

A short and easy walking track descends steeply to the secluded beach at Moon Bay in Mimosa Rocks National Park. Enjoy a picnic on the sand and explore the historic heritage of the area.

Where
Mimosa Rocks National Park
Price
Free
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
  • The walking track from the carpark to Moon Bay is about 250m
  • Remember to take binoculars if you want to bird watch

Upon reaching the sandy and secluded Moon Bay, you’re bound to think the steep walk back will be worth it.

Kick off your shoes to feel the sand between your toes or dip them in the cool water. If you’re interested in fishing, bring along your gear – it’s a great spot to drop a line or catch a wave.

Spend some time exploring the historic artefacts in the area – you might notice rusted stubs of mooring rings and grooves cut into the cliffs – the remains of the log slide and mooring site where timber and farm products were loaded onto barges for transfer to ships.

Be sure to take along a picnic to enjoy in the sun’s warm rays or under the shade of a tree. If you feel like a walk after lunch, try Wajurda Point walking track.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

Promotional:

Google Street View Trekker

Using Google Street View Trekker, we've captured imagery across a range of NSW national parks and attractions. Get a bird's eye view of these incredible landscapes before setting off on your own adventure.

Google Trekker, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Wajurda Point beach view. Photo: John Yurasek