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Kosekai lookout

Dunggir National Park

Overview

Kosekai lookout offers a scenic lookout over the expansive Nambucca Valley all the way to the coast, with picnic tables and good opportunities for birdwatching.

Type
Lookouts
Where
Dunggir National Park
Accessibility
Medium
Price
Free
What to
bring
Hat, sunscreen, drinking water
Please note
  • There is limited mobile reception in this park
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to go birdwatching

Dunggir National Park is blessed with a rugged terrain of steep rainforest ravines and ridges of soaring eucalyptus trees. Kosekai lookout is one of the best places to appreciate the raw beauty of the place. Perched right near the edge of a major drop, visitors will find a generous panorama over the Nambucca Valley all the way to the NSW coast more than 30km away. Several peaks are plainly visible too, including the impressive Mount Yarrahapinni rising in the distance.

This scenic lookout is good to visit at any time of year, with flowers blooming in the spring. But for particularly crisp views, schedule a stop in winter. Be sure to bring binoculars for birdwatching: rainforest pigeons like the wompoo fruit dove roost in the area.

To stretch out your visit into the afternoon, consider packing lunch, particularly in the warmer months. Supplied picnic tables offer a tantalising reason to settle down with the family and enjoy the stellar view for a little longer.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Kosekai lookout, Dunggir National Park. Photo: Rob Cleary