Back to previous page
Print factsheet

Scheyville horse riding trails

Scheyville National Park

Learn more

Learn more about why this park is special

Scheyville horse riding trails is in Scheyville National Park. Here are just some of the reasons why this park is special:

Feathered migrants

Wetlands, Scheyville National Park. Photo: John Spencer

The park sustains an impressive population of permanent and migratory birds, including several precious species like the vulnerable swift parrot and turquoise parrot, and the endangered regent honeyeater. Bring some comfortable shoes and a pair of binoculars to get the most out of this quiet landscape, which changes throughout the year as different species come and go.

  • Longneck Lagoon walking track A small freshwater wetland, Longneck Lagoon walking track allows visitors to see the startling array of birds that frequent the area. Perfect for walking with children.

Putting down roots

Wetlands boardwalk, Longneck Lagoon walking track, Scheyville National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Scheyville National Park protects a large area of the Cumberland Plain Woodland, an endangered ecological community. There’s also a small area of Casltlereagh scribbly gum woodland and shale transition forest. Strolling through Scheyville has much to interest naturalists – and animal enthusiasts, for that matter. The native thorn bush is an important understory habitat for birds. There are over 140 types of waterbirds, offering superb birdwatching opportunities. There are horse riding tracks and places for cycling. There is even an education centre focusing on plants and animals.

  • Longneck Lagoon walking track A small freshwater wetland, Longneck Lagoon walking track allows visitors to see the startling array of birds that frequent the area. Perfect for walking with children.

The Australian story

Army relics, Scheyville National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Scheyville has a rich heritage that gives us a great insight into the past 175 years of Australian history. It has played host to a government cooperative farm and an agricultural training facility. In World War I, it was an internment camp, in World War II, a training base for the First Australian Parachute Battalion. It’s also been a migrant camp for new Australians and an officer’s training unit in the Vietnam War. Scheyville has seen it all. And its remarkable life continues too: around a quarter of a million Australians are linked to the Scheyville site through their ancestors. Because of this, Scheyville is recognised by the NSW State Heritage Register.

  • Migrant Heritage walk Migrant Heritage walk offers an easy stroll around original structures from the post-WWII migrant camp of Scheyville, with interpretive panels detailing the site’s heritage.
  • Scheyville Camp precinct Scheyville Camp Precinct preserves the area’s heritage. Visitors can take an easy walk through restored buildings, learning about the past through interpretive signs.

Education resources (1)

Naturescapes e‑newsletter

Subscribe to Naturescapes

Get the latest news from NSW National Parks

Scheyville National Park, Horseriding trails. Photo: John Spencer/NSW Government