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Little Bay to Smoky Cape

Hat Head National Park

Overview

Discover the beauty of the South West Rocks region on the Little Bay to Smoky Cape walk. Hike this 10km coast walk and enjoy sensational views.

Where
Hat Head National Park
Distance
10km one-way
Time suggested
4hrs
Grading
Hard
Price
Free
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
Please note
  • You can park your car at either Little Bay or Smoky Cape and walk from there
  • Starting at Overshot Dam at Little Bay, follow the ridge to The Gap Beach and Smoky Cape tracks. A one-way journey can take up to four hours.
  • It’s important to pack plenty of water as well as extra sunscreen
  • You may wish to bring your camera and keep an eye out for whales and birds as you go

If you’re an adventurous walker, you’ll love the Little Bay to Smoky Cape walk.

This 10km coastal track begins near Little Bay picnic area in Arakoon National Park, near Kempsey on the north coast of NSW. Start at historic Overshot Dam, where you can feed the ducks before setting off. Then simply follow the ridge to The Gap Beach and Smoky Cape tracks.

As you walk you’ll come across beautiful, diverse scenery including heathland, rainforest and grassy woodland. Depending on the season, you might see wildflower displays or spot whales from the cliffs.

When you arrive at Smoky Cape, head to Captain Cook’s lookout for a picnic lunch and a tour of the lighthouse. Or you can always do the walk in reverse and finish at the picnic area at Little Bay.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Small delicate purple flower. Photo:Debby McGerty