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Boyds Tower to Saltwater Creek walking track

Ben Boyd National Park

Overview

A section of the 30km Light to Light walk, Boyds Tower to Saltwater Creek walk covers 13.2km through scenic coast forest, with opportunities for swimming, fishing and birdwatching.

Where
Ben Boyd National Park
Distance
13.2km one-way
Time suggested
4hrs 30min
Grading
Easy
Price
Free
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
Please note
  • It’s a good idea to put sunscreen on before you set out and remember to take a hat. Drinking water is limited or not available in this area, so it’s a good idea to bring your own.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to go birdwatching or whale watching
  • Strong rips and currents may be present at beaches – take care in the water and please supervise children at all times.
  • Firewood is not supplied
  • If you’re bushwalking in this park, it’s a good idea to bring a topographic map and compass, or a GPS.
  • A current NSW recreational fishing licence is required when fishing in all waters. Please note that netting and spear fishing are not permitted in the park, and you’re not allowed to collect crustaceans and marine animals from the rocks.
  • Be sure to download the Light to Light walk app for iPhone or Android before you set out. The app offers plenty of information about the area’s Aboriginal heritage, plants and animals. You can also download an audio tour and listen to the appropriate sections between Boyds Tower and Saltwater Creek.
  • There is limited/no mobile reception in this park.

For an enticing sample of Light to Light walk, consider tracing a smaller section of its 30km, from Boyds Tower to Saltwater Creek walking track.

This easy walk undulates south past spectacular coastal forest, sandy beaches, rocky bays, sheltered inlets and ocean platforms. Leather Jacket Bay offers a scenic stretch of red rocks, coloured by iron oxide which cemented the sand particles together some 320 million years ago. And, if you’re after somewhere small and peaceful, Mowarry provides a picturesque sandy beach where you can go fishing or swimming.

There’s plenty of spots along the way to stop for picnics, swimming, fishing, or birdwatching. Flowers bloom in the woollybutt forest during spring. Whales frequent the area from late May to early December, making it a great time for whale watching.

Choose to stay overnight at the remote campsite near Mowarry Point or the popular Saltwater Creek campground. To enhance your visit further, check out the smartphone apps for iPhone or Android to access available audio tours.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Google Trekker, Kosciuszko National Park. Photo: John Spencer

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Park info

  • in Ben Boyd National Park in the South Coast region
  • Ben Boyd National Park is always open but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

  • Park entry fees:

    $7 per vehicle per day applies in the southern section of the park. The park uses a self-registration fee collection system. Please bring correct change.

    Buy an annual pass.
    • Merimbula
      (02) 6495 5000
      Contact hours: 8.30am-4.30pm Monday to Friday and some weekends during peak holiday periods.
    • Corner Sapphire Coast and Merimbula Drives, Merimbula NSW
    • Email: FSCR@environment.nsw.gov.au
      Fax: (02) 6495 5055
    More
See more visitor info
Boyds Tower to Saltwater Creek walking track, Ben Boyd National Park. Photo: John Spencer