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Bellamy fire trail

Berowra Valley National Park

Overview

Bellamy fire trail is a northern Sydney secret. This short walk through Berowra Valley National Park connects Pennant Hills and Thornleigh along an easy dog-friendly bushland trail.

Where
Berowra Valley National Park
Accessibility
Medium
Distance
0.4km one-way
Time suggested
18min
Grading
Easy
Price
Free
Opening times

The Bellamy fire trail is open from sunrise to sunset and may be closed at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

Please note
  • It’s a good idea to put sunscreen on before you set out and remember to take a hat and drinking water
  • Dogs are not permitted on the Jungo walk or the Benowie walking track
  • On-leash dog walking is permitted along the Bellamy fire trail as it traverses the adjacent park, Berowra Valley Regional Park
  • Dogs need to be kept on a leash at all times, and please remember to pick up after them.

This short walk through Berowra Valley National Park is perfect for a daily breather. A level path takes you down to Zig-Zag Creek, over a bridge and up to the high walls and towering forest of the old railway quarry, an attractive natural amphitheatre of sandstone.

You’ll see fern trees, grass trees, coachwood and a variety of tall eucalypts while hearing the joyful call of kookaburras. Interpretive signs tell the history of the historic Zig-Zag railway that used to pass through here. Take a seat on the old railway sleepers and enjoy the peace and beauty of the bush before heading back to daily life.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Looking along the Bellamy Fire Trail. Photo: John Yurasek