Back to previous page
PDF Print

Mystery Bay lookout

Eurobodalla National Park


Mystery Bay lookout in Eurobodalla National Park is a great place for scenic views, picnicking, walking, birdwatching and seasonal whale watching on the south coast.

Eurobodalla National Park
What to
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to go birdwatching or whale watching.
  • The weather in the area can be extreme and unpredictable, so please ensure you’re well prepared for your visit, bring appropriate clothing and equipment and advise a family member or friend of your travel plans.

Mystery Bay lookout is in the most southern part of Eurobodalla National Park not far from the picturesque hamlet of Mystery Bay. The lookout offers fabulous scenic views out to the Pacific Ocean where you are likely to see whales during their spring migration, so bring your binoculars along.

The coastal Yuin People traditionally camped, fished and collected resources in this area, a tradition that continues into present. A number of middens and artefact scatters remain in Mystery Bay so keep a close eye out for these.

Next to the lookout is a picnic area, so pack a lunch and spend some time soaking up the scenic surroundings as coastal wattle and pale yellow banksia decorate this charming picnic spot.

There are plenty of walking opportunities from Mystery Bay lookout as well as swimming, fishing and surfing at nearby beaches. For the adventurous, the coastline around Mystery Bay has deep channels that are great for snorkelling.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info


Sign up to Naturescapes

Sign up to our Naturescapes e-newsletter which is packed with information, new products, experiences and events in NSW national parks. Your next park adventure starts here.

Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Mystery Bay lookout, Eurobodalla National Park. Photo: Christina Bullivant