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Barrenjoey Lighthouse

Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park

Overview

Barrenjoey Lighthouse stands at Barrenjoey Head at Palm Beach on Sydney's northern beaches. Built in 1881, this heritage lighthouse is an iconic Sydney attraction.

Type
Historic buildings/places
Where
Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park
Price
Free
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
Please note
  • Guided tours are conducted every Sunday. Contact Kalkari Discovery Centre (9472 9300 or 9472 9301) for more information
  • While the walk to the top is easier than it appears, it does require a moderate level of fitness

Barrenjoey Lighthouse sits at Sydney’s most northern point – Barrenjoey Head at Palm Beach.

Positioned 91m above sea level, the lighthouse can be reached by a couple of walks.  Take the picturesque 1km walking track to the top, which is an easy walk offering outstanding views along the track.  Or for those who are keen for a challenging short hike, take the Smugglers track to the top. Getting its name from the customs officers who built the track around 1850 to monitor any smugglers bringing contraband into Broken Bay, it now offers a steeper and shorter trek to the lighthouse. Don’t worry though, the walk isn’t as hard as it looks and is well worth the effort.

Bring your camera or your binoculars if you’re whale watching. Or you may simply want to capture the panoramic views of Broken Bay, Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park and the Central Coast.

Barrenjoey Lighthouse is one of the Sydney Northern Beaches’ most iconic sights and boasts a notable cultural heritage. Built in 1881 from sandstone quarried on site, the lighthouse, its oil room and keepers’ cottages remain unpainted in the original stone finish.

It is an easy daytrip from Sydney and is a great place to bring overseas visitors – they may recognise the lighthouse from Home and Away. Afterwards, head to the Summer Bay Surf Club for an ice-cream or cold drink.

Take a virtual tour of Barrenjoey Lighthouse on Google Street View.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Park info

  • in Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park in the Sydney and surrounds region
  • Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park is open sunrise to sunset but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

    • Gates to Bobbin Head and Appletree Bay are closed from 8pm to 6am during daylight savings periods, and from 5.30pm to 6am at other times of the year.
    • Gates to West Head are closed from 8.30pm to 6am during daylight savings periods, and from 6pm to 6am at other times of the year.
  • Park entry fees:

    $11 per vehicle per day. Bus or taxi: $4.40 per adult, $2.20 per child (per day). There is no daily entry fee for teachers/educational supervisors (1 adult per 10 children).

    Buy an annual pass.
    • Sydney North (Bobbin Inn, Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park)
      (02) 9472 8949
      Contact hours: 10am-4pm daily. 9am-4pm during summer school holidays (closed 12pm-12:30pm) (closed Christmas Day)
    • Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, Bobbin Head Road, Mount Colah
    • Email: bobbin.head@environment.nsw.gov.au
      Fax: (02) 9457 0113
    More
    • The Basin and Beechwood Cottage (Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park)
      (02) 9974 1011
    • Fax: (02) 9974 4036
    More
  • More
See more visitor info
People standing on a rock looking out to the point. Photo:David Finnegan