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Basin Aboriginal art site

Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park


Basin Aboriginal art site in Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park offers picnicking and walking with some fascinating rock engravings by the Garrigal of the Guringai Nation.

Aboriginal sites
Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park
Entry fees
Park entry fees apply
What to
Drinking water, hat, sunscreen
Please note
  • To preserve the art for future generations, please do not touch Aboriginal sites.
  • Remember to take your binoculars if you want to birdwatch
  • If you’re bushwalking in this park, it’s a good idea to bring a topographic map and compass, or a GPS.

With over 800 Aboriginal sites recorded across Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, each one is a visible reminder of the rich Aboriginal heritage of the region. Basin Aboriginal art site is one of the best examples of rock engravings by the Garrigal people of the Guringai Nation.

Well worth the detour on The Basin track and Mackerel track, this significant site is best viewed early morning or late afternoon, when the shadows give an edge to the faint, yet impressive engravings. Here, you’ll make out the outlines of animals and human figures. After exploring the extensive range of engravings, continue along the medium difficulty walking track and enjoy a picnic in the bush.

There are further examples of Aboriginal heritage with axe grinding grooves and rock paintings and stencils within the park. Middens are also found near rock caves and shelters and contain shells, tools and animal bones.

Take a virtual tour of Basin Aboriginal art site captured with Google Street View Trekker.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info


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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken

Park info

  • in Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park in the Sydney and surrounds region
  • Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park is open sunrise to sunset but may have to close at times due to poor weather or fire danger.

    • Gates to Bobbin Head and Appletree Bay are closed from 8pm to 6am during daylight savings periods, and from 5.30pm to 6am at other times of the year.
    • Gates to West Head are closed from 8.30pm to 6am during daylight savings periods, and from 6pm to 6am at other times of the year.
    • No vehicle access to The Basin campground or to Barrenjoey Headland
  • Park entry fees:

    $12 per vehicle per day. Bus: $4.40 per adult, $2.20 per child (per day). There is no daily entry fee for teachers/educational supervisors (1 adult per 10 children).

    Buy an annual pass.
    • Sydney North (Bobbin Inn, Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park)
      (02) 9472 8949
      Contact hours: 10am-4pm daily. 9am-4pm during summer school holidays (closed 12pm-12:30pm) (closed Christmas Day)
    • Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, Bobbin Head Road, Mount Colah
    • Email:
      Fax: (02) 9457 0113
  • More
  • More
See more visitor info
The view from the top of Barrenjoey Lighthouse. Photo:K. McGrath