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Hungry Gate campground

Hat Head National Park

Overview

Pack your tent or trailer and head to Hungry Gate near Kempsey for a back-to-basics camping holiday. The campground has 20 campsites and is a 20 minute walk from the beach.

Accommodation Details
Number of campsites 20
Camping type Tent, Camper trailer site, Camping beside my vehicle
Facilities Picnic tables, barbecue facilities, toilets
Please note
  • Numbers of picnic tables and wood barbeques are limited
  • Vehicle entry fees are not included in your camping fees.
Price

$6 per adult per night. $3.50 per child per night.

Entry fees Park entry fees apply
Bookings Bookings are not taken for Hungry Gate campground. Camping is on a first come, first served basis. NPWS fee collectors visit campgrounds to collect camping and vehicle entry fees.

Hungry Gate campground is located at the southern end of Hat Head National Park. The area has an open, spacious feel but is protected from the elements by sand dunes and surrounded by thick vegetation. You can bring your tent or camper trailer to Hungry Gate, which sits 30km north east of Kempsey and 32km south of Nambucca Heads.

Take time to admire the established fig trees and paperbarks behind the dunes and you’ll be rewarded – they’re home to a variety of birdlife. Brahimy kites often fly over the beach, just a 20-minute walk away. The park’s kangaroos are fond of the campground and graze there regularly. You’ll also see little bent winged bats and well-fed goannas.

For directions, safety and practical information, see visitor info

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Edward River canoe and kayak trail, Murray Valley National Park. Photo: David Finnegan.

Conservation program:

Saving our Species conservation program

Saving our Species is a innovative conservation program in NSW. It aims to halt and reverse the growing numbers of Australian animals and plants facing extinction. This program aims to secure as many threatened species that can be secured in the wild as possible, for the next 100 years. 

Mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus). Photo: Cate Aitken
Kangaroo. Photo:Debby McGerty